World War II was obviously a time of great social uncertainty in the United States, not merely because of its effective role in the war, although also due to radical adjustments taking place in society. Since an effect from the Jim Crow laws, individuals were beginning to speak up against segregation and demand equal rights. During this time, various activists and political reformists used diverse forms of social networking in order to present their suggestions regarding racism. In 1942, Dr . Seuss published this political animation in the Ny PM newspaper as a way to address the issue of racial discrimination simply by urging enhancements made on the conflict industry. Because the war market did not benefit the use of black labor in the war hard work, the main thought presented in this cartoon is that both light and dark-colored labor are required to achieve true peace and equality in society. Seuss uses significance, his heroes, and textual content in order to properly portray his message to his audience, the people of the United States. Seuss uses Uncle Sam as well as the satirical character " War Industry” in order to represent both the conflicting views on the issue of racism. While The government represents the democratic American ideals of equality, " War Industry” symbolizes the group of people, companies, and ethnicity mindsets that support ethnicity segregation. With this cartoon, The government represents the goal of the American labor force: to add the use of every men, irrespective of race, to be able to fight for the country. However , the War Sector representative is a symbol of a more prejudiced, racist mentality. His leading hat and cigar uncover that he is of a prosperous class, which separates him from the prevalent laborers and working class. He is noticed to be playing only the white keys on the piano, which usually demonstrates the application of only white colored labor in the war attempts. His short hands symbolize his unwillingness to incorporate dark-colored labor into the industry due to bigotry and racial stereotypes. Although Uncle Sam is certainly not violent or perhaps imposing through this cartoon, his...